Frequently Asked Questions

What do I need to know before starting an order?



There are a few things that are important to starting an order. Please read through this list to answer some questions about how your order will go.
  • How long does it take for you to complete my order?

    There really isn’t a short answer to this question. Some jobs can be produced in minutes and some may take weeks or months. Let us know when you need your job completed and we’ll let you know if it can be done. We go to great lengths to meet your most stringent demands.

  • What is a rasterized image and what is a vectorized image? What's the difference?

    Vector and bitmap images are the two major graphic types. Both types are made up of many individual objects, and both respond differently when enlarged and/or reduced to produce different sizes of images. We can use both types of files, however we prefer vector files and we can change sizes easily without sacrificing quality using original vector formats. Vector images can be output at the highest quality in any scale because they are made of lines and panels rather than pixels or dots. Vector images are resolution independent. Common vector formats are eps, ai and pdf. These formats are available in most graphics programs.

    A bitmap image (also called a raster image) is made of pixels (sometimes referred to as dots). The number of pixels in one square inch of an image is called the dpi (dots per inch) and is known as the resolution of the image (Example: 150 dpi means that the image has 150 dots per square inch within that image). Quite simply, the larger number of dots you have in your image produces a higher quality of reproduction. Bitmap images loose quality when the are re-sized from their original size and must be created with consideration for their output use. Bitmap images should be built at 150 dpi if they are built at the actual finished size. You can build the bitmap files at a smaller proportional size than the final usage size, but you must increase the resolution accordingly. For instance, if you build your file at a ratio of 1 inch = 1 foot, you should build the file at 300 dpi. In this case, you would build a 2 inch x 2 inch file at 300 dpi to print a resulting 2 foot x 2 foot image at 150 dpi. Common bitmap-based formats are jpeg, jpg, gif, tiff, png, pict and bmp. Although vector image is the preferred format for submitting artwork, it is not as common for non- designers and bitmap images at the correct resolution can be substituted.

    Larger resolution files also use more bytes of memory & sometimes require special methods to transfer the images. Many graphic files become too large for standard email servers to upload so contact us if you need to get us a larger file.

  • What is a “proof”?

    A proof is a way of ensuring that we have set your type accurately and that everything is positioned according to your requirements. Typically, we will produce a proof which will be sent to you online or printed on paper which can be viewed in our store or delivered to you in person.

    On multiple color jobs, we can produce a color proof on our color output device to show an accurate representation of the final product.

  • Why do I need to look at a proof if I’ve already given you everything I need to have done?

    We employ human beings to produce your work and, last time we checked, humans are not perfect. Your approval on the final proof is assurance that you have looked over every aspect of our work and approve it as accurate. It benefits everyone if errors are caught in the proofing process rather than after the job is completed and delivered.

  • Do I still need to approve a proof if I bring my work in on disk?

    It may seem like a proof wouldn’t be needed in this case but it really is. Output devices process digital information using a variety of processing languages. Your approval of the proof which we will provide assures that the output device used has correctly interpreted and processed the information you have provided.

  • How do I go about getting an estimate from you?

    Well, since you are here, we would suggest you use our request form. Otherwise, the best way to ensure that we get all the information necessary to do an accurate quote, give us a call and talk with one of our customer service representatives.